The best MMORPG that never came to be / Das beste MMORPG das nie gemacht wurde

(ENGLISH / GERMAN)


 

After quite some time we finally got some really decent MMORPGs during the last year. We’re talking Star Wars: The Old Republic (Yes… technically it’s Winter 2011, but we’re not nitpicking here), The Secret World and Guild Wars 2 here. Sure, none of these actually had the success that was probably expected by developers or publishers, but all three are actually good titles – especially if compared to some of the real catastrophes, this genre has seen. However, as befits the christmas-y spirit, I’d like to tell you a different story today. The story of Wish – the best MMORPG that never came to be. Sit down, have a cup of tee and listen to my tale from a long forgotten time…

 

Once upon a time… 2005.

The two great greatly expected titles, Everquest 2 and World of Warcraft, were just released and while the one struggled and the other steamrolled the entire industry, there were faint signs of new projects on the horizon already: Horizons 1, Dark&Light, Vanguard – indeed those real catastrophes I talked about. These titles orientated towards the classic MMORPG model defined by the likes of Everquest, Asheron’s Call or Dark Age of Camelot. However, WoW had already overtaken that model and turned the new developments into mere anachronisms. That Blizzard game took the best features from already existing MMORPGs while at the same time getting rid of anything that resembled frustration, boredom or waiting time. Compared with the competition, the whole leveling process was distinctly easier, faster and smoother. The omnipresent Grind 2 was eliminated, the term “downtime” vanished completely from the vocabulary of the players.

Amidst this upheaval a small studio by the name of Mutable Realms wanted to try a completely different and (it would appear) completely unrealistic way. They called it “Ultra MMORPG” and got their game “Wish” into a beta that would last ten days. I’m taking away the end right here: After those ten days, the game was suddenly and (indeed) unexpectedy canceled. Nevertheless, during that time I enjoyed myself greatly and everyday the game managed to surprise me.

Wish Logo
Wish Logo – best graphic in the game

 

First some things need to be explained though. As already mentiones, WoW removed a lot of frustrating or slowing elements from the archetype of the genre. On the other hand, they also removed some features that basically put the “RP” in MMORPG. I’m not talking about the character creation, experience points, skill systems or the like, but about simple actions like taking an item from your inventory and putting it on a table. The second part is important. Putting it on a table, so other players can see it and interact with it. This is about actions that are performed for their own sake (instead of doing them for experience or some other points). For instance, Lord of the Rings Online has a feature where players can play their own composed music on ingame instruments. In WoW and all of its derivates named above, you won’t find anything like this. They are Themepark MMORPGs. They put the player on a rollercoaster with all the ups and downs and quite some fun and action, but the track is predefined and just can’t be altered.



 

Wish wanted to do it all different. It took the term “persistent world” really serious. The (rare) quests, for instance, could be accepted by everyone, but only the player who solved it first actually got the rewards. The reason is of course, that any NPC needs his or her ten bear arses only once and what are they supposed to do with the hundreds, that are brought by the other players? But the feature that actually stood out was the Live-Team. The developers planned to employ a team that would constantly be there to control and influence the world with stories or events and to react to the players’ actions. “Constantly” was indeed intended to mean 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. You might understand now why I used the term “unrealistic” above. Admittedly it all worked amazingly well during the beta.

Wish Beta
What the actual graphic looked like

 

Players were able to receive current news ingame where they could buy and read a newspaper from certain NPCs. It was written by the Live-Team and distributed in the game every few days. I could still find some extracts from it in a secluded Post in mmorpg.com’s Wish-Forum:

CLADASH – Yesterday, the capital City of Cladash, Khaseldon, was attacked and invaded by an army of undead. Groups of skeletons, ghouls, ghasts and zombies descended into the center of the city. Luckily groups of heroes from across the land, including Gordy, BlackRhino, Efren, Achillon, Moonlight, Letharion, Hunter, Jade Moondragon, Zorbas, Feylaron, Glarshon Dreamsweeper, Wishdragon, Kellir and many others heard the dwarven cry for aid and managed to push back the hordes after a long and arduous battle.

The attack indeed took place in the game world and the mentioned names are – as you can probably guess – those of real players. The exciting part of that story are the background informations that were revewaled by Mutable Realms a few days later. Gamemasters had started the onslaught and simply spawned the monsters near the city. But the plan was actually quite different: The undead hordes were supposed to conquer the city, kill all NPCs and take the capital away from the server’s player population. They didn’t intend for the players to be able to fight back and hold the city. However, the newspaper exceprt clearly shows how the Developers reacted to the player’s actions. There was no cheating, no forcing of events that were planned in some document. Instead. the Live-Team transformed the events into a story and made the players it’s main characters.

LAROCIA – The new strain of the plague that some are dubbing “The Gray Madness” has struck one final blow in Harborview. Many of the town’s local citizens were struck dead yesterday as they went about their business. One witness said, “I saw the provisioner, he was complaining about stomach pains and dizziness. All of a sudden, he fell to his knees and collapsed. He was dead by the time I reached him.” This new strain does not carry with it the graying skin and green colored eyes as its predecessor. It strikes hard and fast. Oddly enough the new strain seems to have left those who were already sick with the previous strain alone. “I’m glad I’m not one of those poor saps.” Coughed Pelson the Commoner before he went searching for a bed to lie down in.

This has, of course, made Harborview a virtual ghost town, but the mayor of Harborview, Mayor Eknod has high hopes. “My scouts are working on something. I will have a lead by the end of the day.”

 

Ah, my favourite story. Rumours were circulating that a plague would threaten the southern part of the game world. Indeed a lot of players first took the death of all the NPCs for a mere bug, but the newspaper proved us wrong again. That such a thing could be part of a planned event was something completely unheard of. While all players were desperately trying to find a solution, Mutable Realms laid back and watched. Only a few days later, we could read the blackmailing letter in the newspaper: For a huge sum of gold (decidedly more than any of us had) the plague would be stopped. Also, the time and place of the handover could be found there.

It became a huge playermob. Everyone wanted to be there when the messenger of the blackmailer arrived and all were discussing the situation quite vocally. But before the messenger could even open his mouth, two players had already attacked and killed him. Negotiaions were over. The reactions of the players was great and above all authentic. Everybody had an opionion, all were looking for a solution. We had a true enemy who we wanted to engage, but unfortunately nobody knew where or how. Again the Live-Team helped: A deserter from the blackmailer’s ranks told us his whereabouts. The mob started to move, it was amazing.

Dance with the Dead
Dance with the Dead

 

Wish had so much problems. The engine was horrible – regarding the graphical quality as well as the performance – there were a lot of Bugs and apart from the Live-Events there was practically no traditional content. I don’t think I saw more than one quest during those ten days. However, that’s quite a big “apart from”. Wish created a truly living world, where players could actually have an influence. The Live-Team acted just like a good Pen&Paper dungeonmaster therein – not against the players but together with them. All in all the project was probably too ambitious, especially considering the environment at that time with the great graphics of Everquest two and the addictive gameplay of WoW. Since then, however, the “RP” vanished more and more. Themepars were more successful. Although this story started just like a fairytale, it doesn’t end like one: The game is dead and with it it’s ideas.

 

/tehK

 


 

Im letzten Jahr kamen nach längerer Zeit tatsächlich wieder einige gute MMORPGs heraus. Wir reden von Star Wars: The Old Republic (technisch gesehen Winter 2011 – aber wir sind nicht kleinlich), The Secret World und Guild Wars 2. Sicher, keines davon hatte den gewünschten Erfolg und es gibt für alle etliche berechtigte Kritikpunkte, aber alle drei sind – besonders im Vergleich mit den wirklichen Katastrophen – gute bis sehr gute Titel. The Secret World ist sogar mein persönliches bestes Spielerlebnis in diesem Genre seit World of Warcraft – aber das ist ein eigenes Thema. Passend zur weihnachtlichen Besinnlichkeit möchte ich allerdings heute eine andere Geschichte erzählen, nämlich die Geschichte von Wish – dem besten MMORPG, das nie gemacht wurde. Setzt euch einen Tee auf, lehnt euch zurück und lauscht meinen Erzählungen aus einer längst vergessenen Zeit…

 

Es war einmal vor langer, langer Zeit… 2005.

Die beiden großen Hoffnungen im MMORPG-Genre, Everquest 2 und World of Warcraft waren gerade herausgekommen und während das eine kränkelte und das andere alles überrollte zeichneten sich am Horizont schon die nächsten Projekte ab: Horizons 3, Dark&Light, Vanguard – eben jene wirklichen Katastrophen, von denen ich vorher gesprochen hatte. Diese Titel orientierten sich am alten Modell der klassischen MMORPGs wie Everquest, Asheron’s Call oder Dark Age of Camelot. WoW hatte dieses Modell aber im Vorbeigehen völlig überholt und machte diese Neuentwicklungen zu schlichten Anachronismen. Dieses Blizzard-Spiel nahm sich die besten Features aus den vorhandenen MMORPGs während es gleichzeitig alles beseitigte, was auch nur annähernd nach Frust, Langeweile oder Wartezeit aussah. Es war das erste Spiel dieser Art, das den Spieler an die Hand nahm und ihn von Anfang bis Ende mit Quests durch die Welt führte. Man brauchte nicht mal mehr Gruppen, um das Maximal-Level zu erreichen. Im Vergleich mit der Konkurrenz war der Level-Prozess deutlich leichter, schneller und flüssiger. Der allgegenwärtige Grind 4 wurde beseitigt, der Begriff “Downtime” verschwand aus dem MMORPG-Vokabular.

Inmitten dieses Umbruchs machte sich ein kleines Entwicklerstudio namens Mutable Realms auf den Weg, einen komplett anderen und scheinbar völlig unrealistischen Weg zu wählen. Sie nannten es “Ultra MMORPG” und brachten ihr Spiel “Wish” in eine zehn Tage andauernde Beta. Das Ende nehme ich vorweg: Nach diesen zehn Tagen wurde das Spiel plötzlich und (wirklich) unerwartet eingestellt. In diesen zehn Tagen hatte ich jedoch eine fantastische Zeit und das Spiel schaffte es jeden Tag, mich zu überraschen.

Wish Logo
Wish Logo – bessere Graphik als im Spiel

 

Dazu muss man vorab noch etwas erklären. Wie schon gesagt, eliminierte WoW viele frustrierenden oder verlangsamende Elemente aus dem Genre-Archetyp. Dabei entfernten sie aber auch viele Features, die für das “RP” in MMORPG stehen. Damit meine ich nicht Charaktererstellung, Experience Points oder Skillsysteme, sondern solche Dinge, wie das einfache Ablegen von Gegenständen aus dem Inventar. Nicht “Zerstören” – “Ablegen”. So, dass ich einen Gegenstand aus dem Inventar auf einen Tisch legen und ein anderer Spieler diesen Gegenstand dann sehen und aufnehmen kann. Es geht um einfache Handlungen und um Dinge, die nur ihrer selbst wegen (nicht wegen Erfahrungs- oder irgendwelchen anderen Punkten oder gar Items) getan werden. In Lord of the Rings Online geht das so weit, dass man selbst die Klampfe anstimmen kann. In World of Warcraft und allen seinen neuen, oben genannten Derivaten sucht man nach solchen Features vergeblich. Es sind Themepark MMORPGs. Sie bieten dem Spieler eine Achterbahnfahrt von Anfang bis Ende mit jeder Menge Spaß und Action, aber die Strecke ist vorgegeben und lässt sich nicht verändern.



 

Wish wollte das alles anders machen. Es nahm den Begriff “persistente Welt” wirklich ernst. Die (seltenen) Quests zum Beispiel konnten zwar alle annehmen, aber nur der erste, der den Auftrag erfolgreich abgeschlossen hatte, bekam auch die Belohnung. Wenn ein NPC zehn Bärenärsche braucht, braucht er die eben nur einmal. Dann hat er sie ja und was solle er schon mit den paar hundert Bärenärschen anfangen, die ihm irgendwelche Spieler anschließend immer noch vor die Füße werfen? Das eigentlich großartige Feature dieses Spiels war das Live-Team. Das Studio plante, dauerhaft ein Team zu beschäftigen, dass ständig dafür zuständig ist, die Welt zu kontrollieren, zu beeinflussen, Stories oder Events zu generieren oder aber auch auf Spieleraktionen zu reagieren. Das Wort “ständig” muss man so verstehen: 24h am Tag, 7 Tage die Woche, 365 Tage im Jahr. Man sieht vielleicht, warum ich oben von “unrealistisch” redete. Während der Beta funktionierte das aber hervorragend.

Wish Beta
Ja, so sah das aus

 

Im Spiel erfuhr man Neuigkeiten durch eine Zeitung, die man bei bestimmten NPCs kaufen konnte. Diese Zeitung wurde von eben jenem Live-Team geschrieben und alle paar Tage im Spiel in Umlauf gebracht. In einem abgelegenen Post in mmorpg.com’s Wish-Forum findet man davon noch Auszüge:

CLADASH – Yesterday, the capital City of Cladash, Khaseldon, was attacked and invaded by an army of undead. Groups of skeletons, ghouls, ghasts and zombies descended into the center of the city. Luckily groups of heroes from across the land, including Gordy, BlackRhino, Efren, Achillon, Moonlight, Letharion, Hunter, Jade Moondragon, Zorbas, Feylaron, Glarshon Dreamsweeper, Wishdragon, Kellir and many others heard the dwarven cry for aid and managed to push back the hordes after a long and arduous battle.

Der Angriff fand tatsächlich im Spiel statt und die genannten Namen waren, wie man leicht erkennen dürfte, reale Spielernamen. Sehr spannend an dieser Geschichte sind die Hintergründe, die Mutable Realms später in der Beta offenlegte. Gamemaster hatten die Attacke durchgeführt und die entsprechenden Monster einfach in der Nähe der Stadt gespawned. Geplant war das aber ganz anders: Die untoten Horden sollten die Stadt einnehmen, alle NPCs töten und damit der Serverbevölkerung ihre Hauptstadt nehmen. Dass hier Spieler einschritten und es wahrhaftig schaffen, die Stadt zu halten, war vom Live-Team in keinster Weise vorgesehen. Der Zeitungsartikel zeigt, wie hier auf die Handlungen der Spieler reagiert wird. Es wurde nicht gemogelt, es wurde kein Ergebnis erzwungen, nur weil es in irgendeinem Dokument so vorgesehen war. Das Live-Team verwandelte Ereignisse in Geschichten und machte die Spieler zu Hauptfiguren.

LAROCIA – The new strain of the plague that some are dubbing “The Gray Madness” has struck one final blow in Harborview. Many of the town’s local citizens were struck dead yesterday as they went about their business. One witness said, “I saw the provisioner, he was complaining about stomach pains and dizziness. All of a sudden, he fell to his knees and collapsed. He was dead by the time I reached him.” This new strain does not carry with it the graying skin and green colored eyes as its predecessor. It strikes hard and fast. Oddly enough the new strain seems to have left those who were already sick with the previous strain alone. “I’m glad I’m not one of those poor saps.” Coughed Pelson the Commoner before he went searching for a bed to lie down in.

This has, of course, made Harborview a virtual ghost town, but the mayor of Harborview, Mayor Eknod has high hopes. “My scouts are working on something. I will have a lead by the end of the day.”

 

Ah, meine Lieblingsgeschichte. Gerüchte waren im Umlauf, dass eine Seuche den südlichen Teil der Spielwelt bedroht. Tatsächlich hielten viele Spieler das NPC-Sterben erst für einen Bug. Dass so etwas Teil eines geplanten Events sein könnte, war völlig neu. Erst durch den Zeitungsartikel wurde uns bewusst, dass sich hier eine Epidemie ausbreitete. Während alle verzweifelt eine Lösung dafür suchten, lehnte sich Mutable Realms zurück. Erst ein paar Tage später erhielten die Spieler einen Erpresserbrief: Gegen eine hohe Summe Gold (deutlich mehr, als jeder hatte) würde die Seuche aufhören. Außerdem waren Ort und Zeit der Übergabe angegeben.

Es wurde ein riesiger Spielermob. Alle wollten dabei sein, wenn der Bote des Erpressers eintraf und es wurde lautstark diskutiert, wie man ihm begegnen sollte. Aber bevor der Bote auch nur seinen Mund aufmachen konnte, hatten ihn zwei Spieler angegriffen und getötet. Die Verhandlungen waren damit also vorbei. Die Spielerreaktionen waren großartig und vor allem authentisch: Ohne es zu merken, spielten alle ihre Rolle in der Welt des Spiels. Jeder hatte eine Meinung, jeder suchte nach einer Lösung für das Dilemma. Man hatte einen wahren Feind, dem man entgegentreten wollte, nur wusste leider niemand wo oder wie. Wieder griff das Live-Team ein: Ein Überläufer aus den Reihen des Erpressers verriet uns den Aufenthaltsort. Der Mob setzte sich in Bewegung, es war fantastisch.

Dance with the Dead
Dance with the Dead

 

Wish hatte so viele Probleme. Die Engine war grauenhaft – sowohl was die graphische Qualität, als auch die Performance angeht – es gab jede Menge Bugs und außer den Live-Events so gut wie keinen traditionellen Content. Ich glaube, ich habe in den zehn Tagen ein ganzes Quest gesehen. Nicht abgeschlossen, aber immerhin. Das ist allerdings ein ziemlich großes “außer”. Wish erschuf eine lebendige Welt, in der Spieler wirklich etwas ändern konnten. Das Live-Team arbeitete wie ein guter Pen&Paper Dungeonmaster – nicht gegen die Spieler, sondern zusammen mit ihnen. Insgesamt war das Projekt wohl zu ambitioniert, insbesondere in der damaligen Umgebung von Everquest 2 mit seiner tollen Graphik und WoW mit seinem süchtig machenden Gameplay. Seitdem verschwand das “RP” mehr und mehr, Themeparks sind einfach erfolgreicher. Obwohl das als Märchen angefangen hat, endet es anders: Das Spiel ist gestorben und mit ihm seine Ideen.

 

/tehK

 

Notes:

  1. renamed to “Istaria”
  2. and don’t even start calling it Quest-Grind!
  3. mittlerweile umbenannt zu “Istaria”
  4. und kommt mir nicht mit Quest-Grind!